China calls on UN to prioritize financial resources for development-xinhua

Photo taken on Sept. 14, 2020 shows the exterior view of the United Nations headquarters in New York, the United States. (Xinhua/Wang Ying)

“We hope that the (UN) Secretariat could optimize the budget allocation to ensure that development is prioritized with adequate and sustainable financial resources, to address the real difficulties and concerns of developing countries, and to promote the implementation of the 2030 sustainable development agenda,” a Chinese envoy said.

United Nations, Oct. 12 (Xinhua) — China hopes the United Nations could prioritize its financial resources for development to better reflect the needs and concerns of developing countries, a Chinese envoy said Wednesday.

Cheng Lie, adviser to the Chinese permanent mission to the United Nations, made the remarks during a meeting of the fifth committee of the United Nations General Assembly, during which UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres presented the plan. of the program and the budget of the proposed program for 2023 of the body of the world.

In the current situation, vast developing countries face greater challenges in economic recovery and the pleasure of better supporting the United Nations. However, the budget level of development sections has too little increase to reflect the demand and appeal of developing countries, Cheng said.

“We hope that the (UN) Secretariat could optimize the budget allocation to ensure that development is prioritized with adequate and sustainable financial resources, to address the real difficulties and concerns of developing countries, and to promote the implementation of the 2030 sustainable development agenda,” the adviser said.

China notes with concern that under Article 24, the Secretariat for the first time includes resources to implement mandates that should be adopted in the name of new expanded mandates, Cheng noted.

Pre-judging the mandate of the UN General Assembly or Human Rights Council and fronting the potential resources section in the budget goes against the basic principle of “mandate first, next programme, budget last,” he said.

The program plans approved by the General Assembly formed the basis of the program budget, which mirrors the program plans from a financial perspective. They generally ensure that the United Nations could accurately implement the mandates and priorities of member states. None of them should be undermined or ignored. Any change in the budget modality should not weaken or sever relations between the two, Cheng said.

Louis R. Hancock